Month: March 2011

Hope in God

Introduction Psalm 5 is another individual lament, and the first instance of a psalm with prayers for the personal downfall of the enemies. Such Psalms have in view a situation where one is faced with bloodthirsty and deceitful prosecutors. David is the author of this Psalm. Explanation of Psalm 5 As is common in the laments, the psalm opens by calling out to God. The tone is one of urgency and expectation. Some psalms speak of the Lord as King have in mind his rule over all his creation. Others, such as this one, refer to him acting as king over his people. The Davidic kingship, when it functioned properly did not usurp either king or divine kingship, though a faithless king could lead to God punishing the people (1 Samuel 8:7; 12:12-15). The singer praises God for loving what is right. The argument of the psalm is that the success of these persecutors would contradict the biblical view of God’s commitment to righteousness. The terms describing evil and evildoers are status words; that is, they describe people who reject God’s kingship, as well as denoting the behavior that stems from such rejection. The phrase “abundance of your steadfast love” comes from Ex. 34:6, the basic confession of Old Testament faith, describing the Lord’s benevolence. Paul uses Psalm 5:9 in romans 3:13 as part of his argument that both...

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The Practice of the Presence of God

Introduction Psalm 4 expresses quiet trust amid troubling circumstances, combining the categories of individual lament and confidence >Many take this as a companion to Psalm 3, because 4:8 seems to echo 3:5. If there is a connection, the past tense of 3:5 sets it in the morning, while the future tense of 4:8 sets it in the evening; any further connection is speculative. Explanation of Psalm 4 You have given me relief in verse 1 between two urgent request is similar to the rhetoric of 3:7: past experience emboldens the faithful to confident prayer. The singer turns form his prayer to address in 4:2-3 those who slander the pious; such people should know that the Lord has set his favor upon the faithful and will listen to their prayers. The idea with “set apart” in 4:3 is that God sets his special attention and affection on a person or a people in order to distinguish them. The Hebrew word “Hasid” is an adjective form of steadfast love (Hesed). This term variously rendered “godly,” “saint,” “faithful one,” and “holy one” in the Psalmists, refers to those who have genuinely laid hold of God’s steadfast love; here it is singular, to stress that each faithful member of the people may have this confidence. The singer in Psalm 4:45 tells the godly not to give into the anger that would lead them...

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The Lord gave and took away

http://media.blubrry.com/servantsofgracemedia/p/www.podtrac.com/pts/redirect.mp3/servantsofgrace.org/mediafolder/TheLordgavetookaway.mp3Podcast: Play in new window | Download | EmbedSubscribe iTunes | Android | Email | RSS | More Subscribe OptionsThis is sermon #24 in the Job series. In this sermon on Job chapters 29-31 Dave preaches on dealing with temptation, growing through trials, dealing with lust, and dealing with...

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Living a blameless life

Introduction A variety of settings for Psalm 26 have been suggested, such as a prayer for public exoneration offered by someone seriously or falsely accused of wrongdoing; or perhaps part of an entrance liturgy by which pilgrims came into the sanctuary. There is scant evidence for any of these, though the latter is helpful because it links the theme with that of Psalms 15 and 24. That is, the psalm mirrors for those who attend worship what the ideal covenant participant should actually look like. Some have taken the claims of innocence here as a kind of self-righteous boasting, but this is a mistake. First the mention of God’s steadfast love and faithful in Psalm 26:3 are a clear echo of Ex. 34:6, and show that divine grace is the foundation for holy living; similarly, the references to worship in God’s house (Ps. 26:6-8) indicate that the covenantal means of grace, with their focus on atonement and forgiveness, are in view, and third, singing this psalm serves to enable worshipers more and more to like and embrace the ideal of faithful covenant membership- but it does not make achieving that ideal a precondition for true worship. Explanation of Psalm 26 For God to vindicate the worshiper is for God to distinguish between the faithful and the impious. The faithful are those who take the covenant to heart, and who...

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Around the Blogs 3/28/2011

Daily Bible Reading: Exodus 16, 1 Samuel 10, Job 4, Psalm 67, Proverbs 4, Isaiah 66, Luke 19, 2 Corinthians 7, Colossians 4, and Revelation 9. Talking Technology with Tim Challies: http://trevinwax.com/2011/03/24/talking-technology-with-tim-challies Honoring the Persecuted Give it all away: http://www2.lifeway.com/secretchurch/index.php/blog/details/post/honoring_the_persecuted_give_it_all_away/ Handling Conflict in Marriage: http://thegoodbookblog.com/2011/mar/25/the-perfect-storms-handling-conflict-in-marriage/ Quote of the Day:  ‎”They who truly come to God for mercy, come as beggars, and not as creditors: they come for mere mercy, for sovereign grace, and not for anything that is due”~Jonathan Edwards...

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