Posted On September 30, 2020

The New Covenant

by | Sep 30, 2020 | Hebrews, Featured

Hebrews 8:8–9, “But God found fault with the people and said[a]:

“The days are coming, declares the Lord,
when I will make a new covenant
with the people of Israel
and with the people of Judah.
It will not be like the covenant
I made with their ancestors
when I took them by the hand
to lead them out of Egypt,
because they did not remain faithful to my covenant,
and I turned away from them,
declares the Lord.”

Scripture tells us that God’s dealings with man are determined by agreements called covenants. As an overarching theme, the covenant of grace is significant in the history of redemption. When Adam sinned by eating the forbidden fruit, God could have allowed all of Adam’s descendants to continue in their sins forever with no hope of redemption. But God, in love, knowing that we could never fulfill His demands, enacted a covenant of grace whereby He would save His people from their sins. In Genesis 3:15, amidst God’s curses, we find the covenant of grace first announced.

The covenant of grace is not without any variety or change. This covenant is unfolded through a variety of successive and progressive “sub-covenants.” Through covenants with Noah, Abraham, Moses, David, and finally Christ, the covenant of grace unfolded. Though the one covenant of grace applies to all of God’s people, past and present, some aspects of these “sub-covenants” do not.

We will look at these “sub-covenants” in more detail next week. At present we are looking at Hebrews 8, which refers to the old and new covenants. The old covenant is to be understood primarily in terms of the Mosaic covenant that was always intended to be superseded by the new covenant in Christ. God gave this covenant not because it would perfect His people in and of itself, but because it would point out their need for absolute dependence on God’s grace and drive them to Christ where His grace is found (Rom. 5:20–21).

The original audience of this epistle should have known that a new covenant would replace the old one. Throughout the Old Testament we see that though the people of God would break the old covenant, God would one day establish a covenant that could not be broken. This hope goes back as early as Deuteronomy 30:1–6 where a grand and glorious restoration from exile is promised to the people of God. This grand hope for restoration in the latter days is found throughout the prophetic books but is expressed most explicitly in Jeremiah 31:31–34, the passage that is quoted in Hebrews 8:8–12.

We conclude today by giving one brief comment about the new covenant. Hebrews 8:8–9 says that it is not like the old covenant. And during the next few days, we will look at what this means.

Coram Deo

We live our entire lives in absolute dependence upon God. From our first breath to our last, it is God who sustains us. This is most evident in our redemption that comes only after the old covenant points out our absolute need for a savior. Never forget your utter dependence on God for all things, especially your salvation.

The New Covenant, Copyright (2020), Ligonier Ministries.

Related Posts

Our Immutable Guarantee

Our Immutable Guarantee

On today’s episode, a listener writes in and asks Dave, “What is divine immutability?” What You'll Hear on this Episode The Bible’s Teaching on the Immutability of God. The Immutability of God at Work in the Christian Life. Subscribing, sharing, and your feedback You...

Why Doing Theology Right Matters—for All Christians

Why Doing Theology Right Matters—for All Christians

You Are a Theologian The case can be made that every Christian is a theologian because every Christian has a theology, whether well thought out or not.1 After all, the word “theology” clearly has to do with God (theos, Greek for “God”), and since the third century at...

Caring for a Family Member With Memory Loss

Caring for a Family Member With Memory Loss

On today’s Equipping You in Grace show, Dave shares about his dad’s dementia and his mom’s Alzheimer’s and considers availing of the means of grace personally and at your local church, along with advice on caring for your family member with memory loss. What you'll...

Five Motivations to Pray

Five Motivations to Pray

For years, when I thought about prayer, I mostly felt guilty for lacking a robust prayer life—reading stories of great saints praying for two hours a day or more left me with a gnawing sense of defeat. I would often resolve to pray more. But the resolves didn’t last....

The Purpose of Hearing the Word and Personal Bible Reading

The Purpose of Hearing the Word and Personal Bible Reading

On today’s Warriors of Grace show, Dave discusses the importance of hearing the Word, why what we hear is a reflection of what we love, hearing the Word and discernment, and delighting in reading the Word. What You'll Hear On This Episode Hearing the Word. The...

Taming Our Scattered Minds

Taming Our Scattered Minds

Controlling our thoughts can be one of the most challenging things to do as a believer. Betty Price, a longtime professor at The Master's University, stops by to unpack what Scripture has to say about how women can daily find victory in this area.

0 Comments

Trackbacks/Pingbacks

  1. Weekly Roundup 9/28/2020-10/3/2020 - Servants of Grace - […] The New Covenant from Ligonier Bible Study https://servantsofgrace.org/the-new-covenant/ […]

Submit a Comment

Your email address will not be published.

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

Share22
Tweet2
Email
Reddit
Share