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christ's death, 6 Things Christ Accomplished by His Death, Servants of Grace
6 Things Christ Accomplished by His Death

Posted On April 29, 2018

 

Was Jesus’ death necessary? Why did He have to die, and what did he accomplish? Here’s a very brief summary of the six core things Christ accomplished in His death.

Expiation

Expiation means the removal of our sin and guilt. Christ’s death removes — expiates — our sin and guilt. The guilt of our sin was taken away from us and placed on Christ, who discharged it by His death. Thus, in John 1:29, John the Baptist calls Jesus “the Lamb of God who takes away the sin of the world.” Jesus takes away—that is, expiates—our sins. Likewise, Isaiah 53:6 says, “The Lord has caused the iniquity of us all to fall on him,” and Hebrews 9:26 says, “He has been manifested to put away sin by the sacrifice of Himself.”

Propitiation

Whereas expiation refers to the removal of our sins, propitiation refers to the removal of God’s wrath. By dying in our place for our sins, Christ removed the wrath of God that we justly deserved. In fact, it goes even further: propitiation is not merely a sacrifice that removes wrath, but a sacrifice that removes wrath and turns it into favor. Propitiation does not turn wrath into love — God already loved us fully, which is the reason He sent Christ to die; it turns His wrath into favor so that His love may realize its purpose of doing good to us every day, in all things, forever, without sacrificing His justice and holiness.

Several passages speak of Christ’s death as a propitiation for our sins. Romans 3:25-26 says that God “displayed [Christ] publicly as a propitiation in his blood through faith. This was to demonstrate his righteousness because in the forbearance of God he passed over the sins previously committed; for the demonstration of his righteousness at the present time, that he might be just and the justifier of him who has faith in Jesus.”

Likewise, Hebrews 2:17 says that Christ made “propitiation for the sins of the people” and 1st John 4:10 says, “In this is love, not that we loved God, but that he loved us and sent his Son to be the propitiation for our sins.”

Reconciliation

Whereas expiation refers to the removal of our sins, and propitiation refers to the removal of God’s wrath, reconciliation refers to the removal of our alienation from God. Because of our sins, we were alienated—separated—from God. Christ’s death removed this alienation and thus reconciled us to God. We see this, for example, in Romans 5:10-11: “For if while we were enemies, we were reconciled to God through the death of his Son, much more, having been reconciled, shall we be saved by his life.”

Redemption

Our sins had put us in captivity, from which we need to be delivered. The price that is paid to deliver someone from captivity is called a “ransom”. To say that Christ’s death accomplished redemption for us means that it accomplished deliverance from our captivity through the payment of a price.

There are three things we had to be released from the curse of the law, the guilt of sin, and the power of sin. Christ redeemed us from each of these.

  1. Christ redeemed us from the curse of the law: “Christ redeemed us from the curse of the law, having become a curse for us” (Galatians 3:13-14).
  2. Christ redeemed us from the guilt of our sin. We are “justified as a gift by his grace, through the redemption which is in Christ Jesus” (Romans 3:24).
  3. Christ redeemed us from the power of sin: “knowing that you were not redeemed with perishable things like silver or gold from your futile way of life inherited from your fathers, but with precious blood, as of a lamb unblemished and spotless, the blood of Christ” (1st Peter 1:18-19).

We are not redeemed merely from the guilt of sin; to be redeemed from the power of sin means that our slavery to sin is broken. We are now free to live to righteousness. Our redemption from the power of sin is thus the basis of our ability to live holy lives: “You have been bought with a price; therefore glorify God in your bodies” (1st Corinthians 6:20).

Defeat of the Powers of Darkness

Christ’s death was a defeat of the power of Satan. “He disarmed the rulers and authorities and put them to open shame, by triumphing over them in him” (Colossians 3:15). Satan’s only weapon that can ultimately hurt people is unforgiven sin. Christ took this weapon away from him for all who would believe, defeating him and all the powers of darkness in His death by, as the verse right before this says, “having forgiven us all our trespasses, by canceling the record of debt that stood against us with its legal demands. This he set aside, nailing it to the cross” (Colossians 2:13-14).

And He Did All of This by Dying as Our Substitute

The reality of substitution is at the heart of the atonement. Christ accomplished all of the above benefits for us by dying in our place—that is, by dying instead of us. We deserved to die, but instead He took our sin upon Him and paid the penalty Himself.  This is what it means that Christ died for us (Romans 5:8) and gave Himself for us (Galatians 2:20). As Isaiah says, “he was pierced through for our transgressions, he was crushed for our iniquities…the Lord has caused the iniquity of us all to fall on him” (Isaiah 53:5-6).

You see, the reality of substitution underlying all of the benefits discussed above, as the means by which Christ accomplished them. For example, substitution is the means by which we were ransomed: “The Son of Man did not come to be served, but to serve, and to give his life a ransom for many” (Matthew 20:28). Christ’s death was a ransom for us — that is, instead of us. Likewise, Paul writes that “Christ redeemed us from the curse of the law by becoming a curse for us” (Galatians 3:13).

Substitution is the means by which we were reconciled: “For Christ also died for sins once for all, the just for the unjust, in order that he might bring us to God” (1st Peter 3:18). It is the means of expiation: “He made him who knew no sin to be sin on our behalf, that we might become the righteousness of God in him” (2nd Corinthians 5:21) and “He himself bore our sins in his body on the cross, that we might die to sin and live to righteousness” (1st Peter 2:24). And by dying in our place, taking the penalty for our sins upon Himself, Christ’s death is also the means of propitiation.

First, all of this is very humbling and should lead us to living humbly before the face of God. Lastly, “Greater love has no one than this, than he lay down his life for his friends” (John 15:13). In His death, Jesus has shown us the greatest love ever known to mankind. May we forever give thanks for His great sacrifice and priceless gift!

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