Category: Theology

Book Review – Did Jesus Really Rise From the Dead? A Surgeon-Scientist Examines the Evidence

Imagine with me for a second if a respected scientist whose been widely published in scholarly journals, lectured at prestigious universities and served in a prestigious role for the National Institutes of Healthy for twenty-six years wrote a book on the resurrection of Jesus Christ. Thankfully we do not have to imagine this; we have such a book in Did Jesus Really Rise From The Dead A Surgeon-Scientist Examines the Evidence by Dr. Thomas A. Miller, MD.  In his book, Dr. Miller responds to the idea that many believe to be true that science is “all authoritative”. This approach leaves many in and outside the science community doubting Jesus’ resurrection as a verifiable, historical event. Miller challenges the notion that modern medicine has disproved the possibility of the resurrection through a careful investigation of the evidence and evaluation of its reliability by demonstrating that science and religion are not incompatible. His approach is a compelling one that will help speak to people in the science community. Many people today question the resurrection of Christ. They think that such an event if it happened isn’t a fact of history but rather a fantasy. If one considers the evidence for the resurrection and understands how ancient history is done, one cannot but come to the conclusion that the resurrection of Christ is a fact of history. To deny that point is...

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Book Review – Revelation for Everyone

Noted and respected New Testament scholar N. T. Wright concludes his “For Everyone” commentary series with the book of Revelation. The overall emphasis of this commentary series is to provide “guides to all the books of the New Testament and to include in them his own translation of the entire text.” Wright’s Hebrews for Everyone commentary was one that was utilized by this reviewer for a Masters level course on the book of Hebrews at Liberty University. Given the highly valuable nature of that text, it was with great anticipation that I began to engage Wright’s effort on Revelation, a book typically avoided by most layman and scholars alike. Wright’s translation of the text of Revelation is easily read and understood. With that said, I did not do a thorough word for word comparison with other popular translations such as the NIV, NASB, ESV, or NKJV; however, the translation offered by Wright did not seem out of place from other translations I have encountered. Given Wright’s reputation as a New Testament scholar, it is likely his theological and linguistic acumen were utilized to a great extent in offering a readable yet accurate translation. It is quite evident Wright takes a much different tact with interpreting Revelation than has been popularized by writers such as Tim Lahaye, Perry Stone, or Hal Lindsey to name a few. Rather than attempting to...

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Book Review – Charts on the Life, Letters, and Theology of Paul

The Apostle Paul – volumes have been written on his life, writings, and theology. One may rightly ask where there would be a need for yet another book that engages the works of the man responsible for writing most of the New Testament. Is there really anything else that can be discussed about Paul or his works that has not already been covered in some commentary, scholarly work or journal article throughout the years? While the works on the life, times, and writings of Paul are certainly voluminous, Lars Kierspel’s “Charts on the Life, Letters, and Theology of Paul” fills a void, that of providing an overview of Paul in chart form. One may rightly ask how the life, letters, and theology of Paul can be reduced to a book full of charts while also asking how a book full of charts on these aspects of Paul would be of any service to layman and scholar alike. As noted in the salient comment on this book by Professor John Polhill, “Kierspel provides us with a treasure trove of information on Paul’s world, life and ministry, churches, letters, and thought. All of this is condensed into a format of some 111 charts, each covering a different topic related to Paul and his epistles.” Providing this type of information in chart form is invaluable to the student of Scripture, the Apostle...

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Book Review – God’s Glory in Salvation Through Judgment

God’s glory in Salvation through Judgment: A Biblical Theology is written by Dr. James M. Hamilton Jr., Associate Professor of Biblical Theology at The Southern Baptist Theological Seminary.  The purpose of this book is to do for biblical theology what Kevin Vanhoozer has done for hermeneutics and David Wells has done for evangelical theology (page 38). Dr. Hamilton begins the book by asking, “Can the Center Hold?, by exploring how others have treated the topic of the metanarrative of the Bible. The part in this chapter one, I appreciate the most is how he handles the various options regarding the metanarrative of the Bible, and yet he still makes the time to recognize that these options have contributed to his own understanding of the metanarrative of the Bible. The author does not just stop at what others have contributed though, but advances the discussion in my opinion in a significant way. The book then protrudes out to look at God’s glory in Salvation through Judgment in the Torah, the Prophets, the Writings, the Gospels, Acts, the Letters of the New Testament and Revelation. The second to last chapter looks at objections to the centrality of God’s Glory in salvation through judgment, and concludes by looking at how God’s Glory in Salvation through Judgment in Ministry Today. Having read Dr. Wells series on evangelical theology and Dr. Vanhoozer’s book, and...

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Book Review – Don’t Call It a Comeback: An Old Faith for a New Day

Don’t Call it a Comeback: The Old Faith for a New Day is edited by Kevin DeYoung with contributions from Tim Challies, Ted Kluck, Russell Moore, Darrin Patrick, Justin Taylor and many more. Kevin DeYoung opens the book by stating the book’s purpose, which is to introduce young Christians, new Christians, and underdiscipled Christians to the most important articles of our faith and what it looks like to live out this faith in real life. The book is divided into three parts. Part one of the book is titled Evangelical History: Looking Forward and Looking Back. The contributors to this section of the book are Kevin DeYoung and Collin Hansen. This part of the book is very helpful especially for those who haven’t studied the history of evangelicalism. In typical fashion, Kevin DeYoung gives careful attention to the issues of reaching the next generation. In typical through fashion Collin Hansen gives the history of evangelicalism. Part two of the book is titled: Evangelical Theology: Thinking, Feeling, and Believing the Truths that Matter the Most. The contributors to this section are Jonathan Leeman, Andy Naselli, Greg Gilbert, Ben Peays, Jay Harvey, Owen Strachan, Russell Moore, and Tim Challies. This section of the book sets the foundation for what an evangelical ought to believe about God, Scripture, the Gospel, the New Birth, Justification, Sanctification, the Kingdom of God, and the exclusivity...

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