Posted On January 12, 2016

In Proposition 7, George Peters states:

“The kingdom being a manifestation of the supernatural, miracles are connected with it.”

I am enjoying the flow of Peters’ argument thus far as he is building slowly but surely on his propositions, establishing a theological and scriptural fact and then moving on to the next logical element which follows the preceding claim. In this case, given the kingdom is supernatural, one should come to expect the miraculous to be associated with the coming and establishment of the kingdom. Think about this in a future context for a second. We currently live in a world marred by sin with death, decay, and sorrow the reality. The future kingdom of our Lord will be one where sin, death, and sorrow have been wiped away. Such an existence must necessarily be a miracle as it takes a supernatural act by God to rid the world of that which sin has so negatively influenced.

The most notable observation Peters presents in Proposition 3 is the following:

“The solution of miracles is found the in their connection with God and His expressed Will. This Will is especially noticeable in the doctrine of the kingdom. The kingdom, as the product of the supernatural, demands miracles; so that faith and hope in the kingdom, as covenanted and predicted, requires belief in the miraculous. Faith in miracles is embraced in an intelligent utterance of the prayer, “let Thy will be done on earth as it is in heaven,” and the assurance that the same will ultimately be realized is expressed in “Thine is the power.” The believer gratefully acknowledges his indebtedness to miracles; for proceeding from the Divine Will, they teach us in the most forcible manner that in this Will all forces, all life, all things exist; that in this Will is found an overruling, all-pervading Providence capable of general and special energy and supervision; and that in it will be found the most ample resources to meet the requirements as predicted and promised, of the blessed kingdom itself. The miracles strengthen faith, enliven hope, and, amide the pressure of natural laws which entail evil, cheer the heart of the pilgrim with joy at a coming miraculous restitution. The Scriptures can never, never be fulfilled without miracle; man can never, never be delivered without miracle; and, therefore, the Redeemer in whom we trust for redemption is, as history today attests in the minute and wondrous fulfillment of His miraculous words, a miracle working Savior. Let infidelity separate God and the world from each other (and even deny that the latter had a Creator), so that the one is not directly interested in the other, it may content itself with the unreasonable, cold, cheerless, dark prospect that this view imparts, its darkness only deepened by the loudly sung deceptive praises of “cosmic force” and a death-devoted humanity; faith in preference takes the soul-inspiring Biblical conception of a creation that has its origin and continuance in a personal, intelligent, loving, all-powerful God; that this is sufficiently indicated in the Word, in miracles of knowledge and work, in history indicating a progressive plan, in the personal experience of the believer, in the person, doctrine, and works of the Messiah; and that this will ultimately be visibly manifested in the kingdom of God, when God again dwells with man, man is rescued from his ruined condition, and placed in a renewed creation where no (unalterable) natural law shall exist to burden him with evil.”

Peters essentially walks the reader through history as we know it and declaring that which we long for, namely the return of our Lord and the restoration of that which has been marred by sin. Redemption is a miracle of God, something only He can accomplish by His divine will. Subsumed within this reality is a number of truths, many of which Peters aptly outlines – God as Creator, the reality that things before sin were perfect, the pervasive impact of sin, the coming of the Redeemer, and his return yet in the future to restore both creation and man’s relationship with God. We also find the unfortunate reality that man has a desire to reject God as Creator and Jesus as the necessary redeemer. Despite man’s penchant to reject God, the Divine will and purposes of the Father to institute the kingdom will take place. What a beautiful picture of the Father’s love for His people and at the same time, what a horrific picture of the nature of sin.

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