Spurgeon on the Christian Life by Michael Reeves is the latest installment in the Crossway Series, Theologians on the Christian Life. This excellent book covers some basic biographical information on the Prince of Preachers. He is rightly described as a man who “went at all of life full-on.” Spurgeon was a man of “deep affections.” Reeves is quick to characterize Spurgeon as a man of deep joy and God-centered wisdom.

Spurgeon was a man who possessed a strong reverence for Christ and his Word. A fair amount of space is devoted to showing how Spurgeon made Christ central in his life and his pastoral ministry: “You cannot taste the sweetness of any doctrine till you have remembered Christ’s connection with it,” writes Spurgeon. He was a man who was gripped by the Bible which is evident to anyone who reads his sermons.

Spurgeon was cut from the cloth of the Puritans. This man was a Calvinist through and through. Reeves adds, “Spurgeon was a Puritan and a Calvinist not through adherence to any theological system or tradition as such but because he believed such theology most glorifies Christ.” But Spurgeon never got boxed in by his theological systems. Above all, he was a Christian: “We believe in the five great points commonly known as Calvinistic, but we do not regard those five points as being barbed shafts which we are to thrust between the ribs of our fellow-Christians. We look upon them as being five great lamps which help to irradiate the cross; or, rather five great emanations springing from the glorious covenant of our Triune God, and illustrating the great doctrine of Jesus crucified.”

Reeves labors to explore the essence of Spurgeon’s preaching. The general purpose of his preaching is explored, and his exegetical habits are examined. Spurgeon’s first aim in the pulpit was to clearly and faithfully preach Christ crucified. The author remarks, “If he is to be preached faithfully, the Christ who is the light and glory of God must be preaching by clearly and beautifully.” This is the kind of preaching that marked the ministry of C.H. Spurgeon.

Spurgeon’s passion for doctrine appears through this work with an emphasis on regeneration, conversion, human inability, sanctification, and the cross of Christ. “The cross,” writes Spurgeon, “that deepest revelation of the glory of God – is the great weapon that breaks down the heart’s defenses.”

Dr. Reeves presents an honest appraisal of Spurgeon. He was a man of prayer. But he was also a man who battled most of his adult life with despondency and depression. This leads to what may very well be the most important feature of the book, namely, the emphasis on fighting for joy. In one sentence, Reeves articulates Spurgeon’s heart on this matter with deep insightfulness:

“Christians must, then, fight for joy, and fight for that intimacy with God that fosters joy. Such is the warp and woof of the Christian life that Spurgeon lived so well.”

One may wonder how such a book could make any significant contribution, especially in light of some very good recent publications that survey the life and ministry of Spurgeon. Books like Living By Revealed Truth by Tom Nettles, The Forgotten Spurgeon by Iain Murray, Spurgeon’s Sorrows by Zach Eswine, and most recently, Steal Away Home by Matter Carter and Aaron Ivey have uncovered a wealth of information about the Prince of Preachers. But Spurgeon on the Christian Life is a helpful addition, indeed. This very readable book presents Spurgeon in an honest light which glorifies the great God of the universe. Readers would be remiss to ignore this precious treasure!