Don't Call It a Comeback Don’t Call it a Comeback: The Old Faith for a New Day is edited by Kevin DeYoung with contributions from Tim Challies, Ted Kluck, Russell Moore, Darrin Patrick, Justin Taylor and many more. Kevin DeYoung opens the book by stating the book’s purpose, which is to introduce young Christians, new Christians, and underdiscipled Christians to the most important articles of our faith and what it looks like to live out this faith in real life.

The book is divided into three parts. Part one of the book is titled Evangelical History: Looking Forward and Looking Back. The contributors to this section of the book are Kevin DeYoung and Collin Hansen. This part of the book is very helpful especially for those who haven’t studied the history of evangelicalism. In typical fashion, Kevin DeYoung gives careful attention to the issues of reaching the next generation. In typical through fashion Collin Hansen gives the history of evangelicalism.

Part two of the book is titled: Evangelical Theology: Thinking, Feeling, and Believing the Truths that Matter the Most. The contributors to this section are Jonathan Leeman, Andy Naselli, Greg Gilbert, Ben Peays, Jay Harvey, Owen Strachan, Russell Moore, and Tim Challies. This section of the book sets the foundation for what an evangelical ought to believe about God, Scripture, the Gospel, the New Birth, Justification, Sanctification, the Kingdom of God, and the exclusivity of Christ.

The final part of the book is titled: Evangelical Practice: Learning to Live Life God’s Way. The contributors in this part are Ted Kluck, Darrin Patrick, Ed Redmond and Kevin DeYoung, Justin Taylor, Denny Burk, Thabitti Anabwile, Tullian Tchividjian, and David Mathis.

This book aims to introduce young Christians, new Christians and underdiscipled Christians to the most important articles of our faith and what it looks like to live out this faith in real life. In recent years there has been a trend among many Christians to devalue doctrine in favor of just “living” the Christian life. The other trend that many Christians have fallen for is emphasizing doctrine over implementing one’s doctrine into one’s life. What, I appreciate the most about this book is its intentional awesomeness. This book is awesome, because it doesn’t assume the reader understands anything about evangelicalism. Rather this book offers a brief history of evangelicalism, its doctrines and its practice. This book will not only help the young, new Christian or even the underdiscipled believer, but also the Pastor and scholar.

Don’t Call It a Comeback: An Old Faith for a New Day is an excellent book. Having set the historical and theological context for evangelicalism firmly in the Word of God the authors protrude out to deal with social issues such as vocation, social justice, homosexuality, abortion, and gender confusion. Whether the authors are discussing theological or practical issues- they never assume the Gospel or the Word of God, but instead keep the readers’ attention on Jesus, and His Word.

The part that I appreciate the most about this book is how it sets the historical context and then expands to build the case for a truly evangelical faith, and concludes by looking at how the historical faith of evangelicalism can be applied to today’s theological and social issues.

Don’t Call it a Comeback: An Old Faith for a New Day is a book that can be devoured as a devotional, or used to help one think through theological and social issues from a Christian worldview. For whatever purpose, and reason you read “Don’t Call it a Comeback” this book should be read slowly, thoughtfully and with discernment.

I recommend that you  read this book, as it is a true feast in a world that devalues truth, and mocks biblical Christianity. By reading this book- you will begin your journey in understanding that the Christian faith  is a faith thoroughly grounded in the Word and Work of Jesus Christ.  Pick up this book, but only do so, if you are prepared to be humbled and stretched in your understanding of  Jesus, church history, the mission of the Church, and your role in the mission of God.

Disclosure of Material Connection: I received this book free from the publisher through the Crossway book review bloggers program. I was not required to write a positive review. The opinions I have expressed are my own. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255 : “Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising.”