Author: Zach Barnhart

The God Who Became Human: A Biblical Theology of Incarnation (Graham A. Cole)

When it comes to doing biblical theology, a common pattern is to take a topic or a theme and trace it from Genesis to Revelation. The Covenants, for example, between God and man, are meant to be a theme that we attempt to look for from the beginning of humanity to the ending of mankind, showing how God and man interact covenantally throughout Scripture and history. “But what of the Incarnation?” (17). Is the idea of God taking the form of a servant, being born in the likeness of men a biblical-theological narrative being told even in the Old...

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The Majesty of Mystery: Celebrating the Glory of an Incomprehensible God (K. Scott Oliphint)

“Such knowledge is too wonderful for me; it is high; I cannot attain it” (Ps 139:6). David’s words in this verse sum up my thoughts when I come before Scripture, good books, and teachers of theology. Discourses on various doctrinal concepts have kept theologians busy for millennia. It is simply too wonderful, and yet, entirely fascinating. There is a majesty in mystery, as K. Scott Oliphint puts it, and it is worth plumbing the depths of theology. In one sense, The Majesty of Mystery is extremely deep and will stretch anyone’s brain. Mostly, that is because of the subject...

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Chasing Contentment: Trusting God in a Discontented Age (Erik Raymond)

When I read the Puritans, I often feel completely in their debt, but part of me is also envious of their lives. They always seem so…fine. Nothing ever throws them. Life never seems “messy” on their pages. It feels like a disconnect at times to read Samuel Rutherford in 21st century America. Erik Raymond says the reason for this is the chasm that exists between the contentment of the Puritans and the discontentment of our age today. The words “restless, unhappy, unsatisfied, and curious” (22) so brilliantly define the heartbeat of today’s world. How do we get out of...

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Pride The Foe of Joy

Perhaps the fiercest and most hostile arch-nemesis to joy is Pride. It may be no surprise to us when we often hear that pride is the root of all sin. You can trace Pride’s evil touch in everything else, after all. It is, as one called it, “the chief vice.” It may also not surprise you that pride was working to steal joy from the beginning of humanity. The story of Adam and Eve’s sinful decision to eat of the forbidden fruit goes to show just how joyful man before the Fall was, and how swiftly the enemy came...

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The Triune God (Fred Sanders)

Let’s face it: the Trinity is without a doubt the most important, complex, and debated doctrine in all of Christian thought. For thousands of years, Christians have been attempting to define the Trinity, and nothing is new under the sun. Even today, despite all of the exegesis and the systematic and historical theology textbooks we have access to, questions still remain, persuasions still divide. We cannot exhaust our study of the Trinity, nor should we want to. Yes, it can be taxing, but it is the stuff on which worship is founded. Says Fred Sanders, “All theology ought to...

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