Author: David Dunham

Eschatology and Theological Humility

Despite the absence of people, it was a lively Tim Horton’s. Our little café table had five men crowded around it in lively, somewhat heated conversation. We were discussing the upcoming sermon for Sunday morning, and the evidences of our theological diversity were showing. We were quite a collection of pastors, all from different backgrounds, all serving on the same church staff. We had come together from various Baptist, Methodist, and Church of Christ backgrounds. We had moved away from some doctrinal positions to come together. Some had abandoned their views on baptismal regeneration, others their views on perfectionism,...

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“Compassion without Compromise” by Adam Barr and Ron Citla

Grace and truth are to be the key markers of all Christian relationships. Often we find that we can be good with one or the other of these characteristics, but to combine both takes great sensitivity and ultimately the guidance of the Holy Spirit. The balance of the two is particularly important when we consider the way the Christian community can and should relate to the LGBT community. Compassion without Compromise offers a simple exploration of the balance of grace and truth in this very relationship. Books on the church and homosexuality are extremely popular right now. In many...

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Sanctification: Explorations in Theology and Practice

The doctrine of sanctification has a reputation as justification’s puny little brother. In reality, however, sanctification has a lot of theological and practical importance. Sanctification demonstrates this well. The collection of essays combined in this volume offer a stimulating look at the breadth and depth of the doctrine’s value. The book’s twelve authors combine a host of backgrounds and perspectives to further the conversation on the topic of sanctification. It is a topic that is currently undergoing a renewed interest. Kapic points to the popular level discussion already happening. Some Reformed readers might think immediately of the debates between Tchividjian and DeYoung at TGC. This volume, however, has no interest in the popular level discussion. Instead they are seeking to broaden the discussion. The essays are definitely of an academic theological nature, readers looking for more on the popular level conversation will be likely be overwhelmed. Readers, however, seeking to glance at the immense depth and complexity of the doctrine of sanctification will not be disappointed. The book is not a unified presentation on the doctrine. As Kapic says: No attempt has been made to provide a unified perspective on sanctification here – we are not presenting some new school of thought or anything like that, as some of the subtle disagreements even within this volume indicate. (11) Think of the volume as its subtitle suggests: explorations in theology...

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Worldly Saints by Michael Wittmer

I am a man of many loves. I love movies and music, food and fashion. And Jesus. The last of these must necessarily hold priority of affection in my heart, but often the other interests take up most of my time. This imbalance has often weighed on me and caused no small amount of guilt. How can I love Jesus rightly and yet still enjoy living my life? It’s a question that apparently many ask; in particular it is a question that Michael Wittmer has asked. He asks it again in his newest book Worldly Saints, and offers an...

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God’s Battle Plan for the Mind

Transformation comes through the “renewal of the mind,” or at least that’s what the Apostle Paul believed. He teaches as much to the Romans. Our thinking habits have massive implications for our lives. Like the Apostle the Puritans saw the relationship of our thought life to our spiritual life. David Saxton wants to help believers today recover a sense of this relationship. If God’s Battle Plan for the Mind tends to oversell the value of meditation, it nonetheless encourages the real value of this neglected spiritual discipline. “The goal of this book,” writes Saxton, “is to convince God’s people...

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