Author: Brian Cosby

God’s Self-Sufficiency: Embracing the Reality that God Doesn’t Need You

In 2009, my wife and I purchased a home in Atlanta, Georgia. Despite being a larger house in a nice neighborhood, it was what our realtor called “a handy man special”. It needed some serious TLC. The fact that dogs had used the walls to “mark” their territory and cigarette smoke seemed to hang around like an unwanted guest, made my wife initially refuse the deal. But, I assured her of my (never-before-seen) carpentry skills and off we went—paint brush and all! Trips to the local Home Depot soon began to drain my bank account. The items that needed...

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Patristic Contributions to Trinitarian Theology

The historical development of Trinitarian theology was anything but unencumbered and straightforward. Articulating and explaining how one God exists in three persons—who are equal in substance, essence, and glory from all eternity—was the primary theological task of the first five centuries. Heretical factions, such as Modalism and especially Arianism, played important roles in the doctrine’s development and codification as well as the vigorous and determined study of the Old and New Testaments. From Theophilus and Irenaeus to the Cappadocian Fathers and Augustine, the Patristic conversation unequivocally concentrated on the Trinitarian debate and was tantamount with the historical milieu, seen...

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The Quest for the Historical Adam – A Review

The intriguing title, The Quest for the Historical Adam, by William VanDoodewaard, is patterned after Albert Schweitzer’s (in)famous The Quest for the Historical Jesus (1910). But rather than a focus on the “last Adam,” VanDoodewaard focuses on the first Adam. And rather than reducing or marginalizing the authority and plenary inspiration of Scripture—as Schweitzer did—VanDoodewaard seeks to affirm it. Dr. VanDoodewaard (PhD, University of Aberdeen) serves as professor of church history at Puritan Reformed Theological Seminary and is an ordained minister in the Associate Reformed Presbyterian Church (ARP). He has written a number of articles for academic journals and...

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Five Points by John Piper

Mark Dever, the pastor of Capital Hill Baptist Church, recently articulated 12 sources God has used to reinvigorate Reformed theology among a younger generation in our day. Among them he named John Piper. Piper, said Dever, is probably “the single most potent factor in the recent rise of Reformed theology.” As part of the young, restless, and Reformed movement, I concur. Piper’s new book, Five Points, summarizes the basic doctrines of Reformed theology in a clear, accessible, and winsome way.  If you’re wondering, “What are the ‘five points of Calvinism’ all about?” this book is for you. John Piper served as Pastor...

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The Doctrine of Predestination

The Protestant Reformation was a movement in sixteenth-century Europe that sought to reform the Roman Catholic Church back to a Christ-exalting, gospel-believing, and Word-centered expression of the Christian faith.[i] However, the more the Scriptures shed light on the errors of the Church’s theology at the time, the greater the divide between Protestants and Catholics became. The cries for reform, however, didn’t begin in the sixteenth century. Many clergy were corrupt—living luxurious lives of rampant immorality and sexual promiscuity. Church positions were given to the highest bidder or to family members and widespread skepticism plagued the church due to its...

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